Seed Supply Update, 2018 Starter Fertiler Data  12/31/18 10:31:07 AM

 

HAPPY NEW YEAR—with the turn of the calendar to a new year—the process of planting another crop, and everything associated with successfully completing this task, begins once again. 

 

SAVE THE DATEWILES BROS. FERTILIZER INC CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO OUR ANNUAL SPRING CLINIC--WEDNESDAY MARCH 6TH, 2019—CASS CO. FAIR EXPOSITION CENTER --8420 144TH ST. WEEPING WATER NE.---8:00  A.M. TILL NOON—Agenda to follow in the coming weeks!

 

Seed Supply Update—12 % Volume with a 6% Cash Discount on all seed orders expires on January 19th

 

 

Seed Supply Update---It is not unusual for high performing and high demand hybrids/varieties to have supply issues during the selling season.   This year is no different.  However, that does not mean that there still are not viable options for your operation for the 2019 planting season.  Below are some options for corn and soybeans where there is STILL AMPLE SUPPLY. 

 

Corn

DKC60-88RIB – average yield of 242.3 bu./A in common plots – This 110 Day RM yielded far beyond it’s maturity and it showed with a 33% top 3 rating and a 73% top half rating.  This is a hybrid that should be on everyone’s order.  It’s a hybrid that can be planted early so it can be harvested early.

 

DKC63-57RIBNEW Hybrid--average yield of 237.5 bu./A in limited plots – This hybrid is running with top performers very well in common plots and is probably one of our “sleepers” of 2018.  It’s in the top 3 of the plots 29% of the time and in the top half 41% of the time.

 

DKC64-35RIB – average yield of 235.1 bu./A in common plots – It’s in the top 3 of the plots 30% of the time and in the top half 45% of the time which is slightly off from where it was the last 2 years.  Some of that can be attributed to spots of green-snap, some to it being a year where the fuller and shorter season corns just hit the niche better.  If you look at the 3 year averages,  it’s in the top 3 of the plots 43% of the time (44 locations) and the top half 74% of the time (76 locations)—Historically a good choice for every operation!!

 

DKC66-75RIB – average yield of 244.7 bu/A in common plots – This was last year’s “sleeper”, and it’s showing great strength in performance and plant health again.  It’s in the top 3 of the plots 45% of the time and in the top half 79% of the time. 

 

Soybeans

 

AG33X8 – average yield of 64.6 bu./A in common plots – In the top 3 of the plots 28% of the time and in the top half 64% of the time.  This is another bean that will compliment AG36X6 very well performing just as well as it did last year. 

 

AG37X8 – average yield of 65.8 bu./A in common plots – In the top 3 of the plots 40% of the time and in the top half 80% of the time.  This versatile dryland bean is a solid companion to AG36X6 and performing even better than it did last year.

 

AG39X7 – average yield of 63.8 bu./A in common plots – In the top 3 of the plots 21% of the time and in the top half 75% of the time.  This later maturity is the bean that has a strong performance on the tougher dryland acre.  It’s probably our closest “look alike” to AG4034’s not only in physical appearance but also in yield.

 

CORN STARTER FERTILIZER STUDY


We continually evaluate our fertility levels in the soil. Over time, both academics and producers using starter fertilizer agree, that banding or in furrow starter fertilizers plus additives can pay off considerably in high yield arenas. BUT, what happens under various soils, fertility levels, etc. This is the question we ask every year about this time.  SO, we started this trial 5 years ago and it has evolved a bit since then.  (Refer to our website for the entire historic treatments and results)If you remember the history of this study, we tried to minimize the fertility variances of all fields by keeping the study at our Mynard location.  BUT, this raised the question “Are/Do all of your fields have the same soil type, soil pH.  Etc?”  The answer is NO.  So, this year, we implemented the KISS method—(Keep It Simple Stup)—well, you get the idea.  Our base treatment has been 5 gal. of Optistart--9-18-6-2Sulfur 0.5 Zn-0.05 MNw Avail + 3.4 oz of Capture LFR  + 3.6 oz. of Xanthion.   We used this again in 2018, but instead of included additional components to the base treatment as we have in the past, we kept the base treatment the same, but, included 4 additional locations/fertility levels/ planting dates…etc.  Now, we are including a whole bunch of additional variables (soil type, soil pH, etc.)  that could be/should be statistically argued that will influence the results of what we found the previous 4 years at the same Mynard site.   What we found was that adding 4 additional testing sites did not change the running average results too much even with the additional locations/variables.

Here is a summary

RESULTS of same treatments since 2014

             
   

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Running Ave.

 Untreated check

 

177.4

201.2

245.5

216.9

230

214.2

1.  5 gal of Optistart Pro--9-18-6-2Sulfur 0.5 Zn-0.05 MNw Avail

209.1

202.5

261.7

225.8

   

2.  5 gal of Optistart Pro--9-18-6-2Sulfur 0.5 Zn-0.05 MNw Avail 

187.4

204.8

253.4

219.2

   

 + 3.4 oz of Capture LFR

             

 3.  5 gal of Optistart Pro--9-18-6-2Sulfur 0.5 Zn-0.05 MNw Avail

199.7

207.7

258.3

228.9

233.6

225.64

 + 3.4 oz of Capture LFR + 3.6 oz of Xanthion

           

 4.  5 gal of Optistart Pro--9-18-6-2Sulfur 0.5 Zn-0.05 MNw Avail

     

237.7

   

3.4 oz of Capture LFR  + 10 oz of Optify Stretch

           
               

4 Year Ave.

             

Untreated

             

All Starter Treatment Ave.

11.29 Advantage

       
               

2018 Study--5 Locations/plant date--DeKalb DKC60-88 base genetics

         
               

Untreated

230

           

5 gal of Optistart Pro--9-18-6-2Sulfur 0.5 Zn-0.05 MNw Avail

233.6

           

+ 3.4 oz of Capture LFR + 3.6 oz of Xanthion

             

Previous 4 year average difference was 13.4 bu.acre between Untreated and the Base Treatment

         

 

5 yr. average is now 11.38 with additional 4 testing locations from 2018.

         
                     

 

 

Granted, in 2018 there was only a 3.6 bu./acre difference.  Hardly enough to justify the cost of the treatment ($20-25) per acre, much less the cost of planter modifications (About $450.00/Row).  However, one can make an argument for the long-term value of the investments.  Another reason to consider this are the yield levels that we are achieving.  200 bu./acre corn has become quite common lately.  Yes, timely rainfall the past few years have certainly made the corn crop—that is one part of the recipe.  Consider that it takes a number of years of balanced fertility programs to support high yielding crops.  Remember that 200 bu. corn can remove up to 80 lbs. of phosphate P2O5 in grain, in one year and also understand that phosphate is tightly held in the soil and not immediately plant available once it is applied.  The point here is, placing non soil mobile nutrients in the root zone where the developing crop can access it has a larger long-term value than we realize—especially when growing high yielding corn

 

 

John W McNamara

Agronomist

Wiles Bros. Inc.

606 Wiles Rd

Plattsmouth NE. 68048

(402) 298-8550—Office

(402) 499-3870—Cell

jmcnamara@wilesbros.com

 
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