Spring Soil Moisutre Status, 2018 Plot Lineup  03/13/18 9:03:56 AM

THANKS to all who braved the winter weather last Tuesday to attend our annual Spring Meeting.  Your participation made it an informative and interactive day!  We will see you again in late August.

 

Going into the 2018 growing season--soil moisture in our local area is in generally good shape—for the moment! Aside from the Early October heavy rain we experienced, we really haven’t had too much precipitation since then.  Snow really never counts since the ground is frozen and mostly blows off into the ditches without any real benefit to soil moisture status.    As always, with every year’s crop, the main issue as we approach planting is soil moisture conservation.   This is important since corn can root and absorb moisture from a 4 foot depth, BUT, remember that newly planted corn will start absorbing moisture in 24-48 hours after planting and they absorb about 30 % of their weight in water before germination begins.  It doesn’t need much in the beginning, but we need uniform soil moisture at planting depth to achieve a uniform stand.  So, we need to bank” as much moisture as possible in the soil for later stages of growth and development.    By comparison, soybeans must imbibe about 50 % of their weight in water.  But since soybeans are approximately 2/3 the weight of corn kernels, the total amount of absorbed water required for germination is relatively similar.

 

http://www.aganytime.com/PublishingImages/Agronomy/CornWaterUseandIrrigationTimingImage1.png

Source: Kranz, W.L. et al. 2008. Irrigation management for corn. NebGuide G1850. University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension.

 

An average silt loam, which can hold about 2 inches of water per foot of soil, results in about 8” of soil water in a full 4’ soil profile.   An average corn crop here in Eastern Nebraska can use through transpiration between 25-28” of water per season.  Long story short, going into planting we need to conserve as much soil moisture as possible (see map below)

http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/data/jpg/20180306/20180306_NE_text.jpg

 

 

Planting Rates and Spacing----In the past weeks we have reviewed the importance of seed size.   Plant spacing and it's potential affects on yield are also an important piece to this recipe.. The following tables provide a good reference for in-field planter calibration as well as determining your final stand once the crop has emerged.

Soybeans

                        Plant Number per linear foot of row in a given row width

Population                                36”     30”      20”      15”     10”        7”

 

200,000                                   14.6     11.5     7.5       5.75    3.8        2.7

175,000                                   12.8     10        6.6       5         3.3        2.3      

150,000                                   10.9     8.6       5.7       4.3      2.8        2.0      

125.000                                   9.1       7.2       4.8       3.5      2.4        1.7

100,000                                   7.3       5.7       3.8       2.85    1.9        1.3

75,000                                     5.4       4.3       2.9       2.15    1.4        1.0

 

*American Society of Agronomy

 

Corn Population Chart

Seed Spacing

Corn Population—Row Spacings

In Inches

 

 

30

36

]4 7/8

 

 

 

35800

5

 

 

 

34474

5 1/4

 

 

 

33243

5 1/2

 

 

 

30813

5 5/8

 

 

 

29628

5 7/8

 

 

35553

28531

6 1/8

 

 

34237

27512

     6 3/8

 

 

33014

26747

6 1/2

 

 

32097

25677

6 3/4

 

 

30813

24690

7   

 

 

29628

23775

7 3/8

 

 

28531

22926

7 5/8

 

 

27512

21398

8 1/8

 

 

25677

20542

8 1/2

 

 

24650

19752

8 7/8

 

 

23702

19020

9 1/8

 

 

22824

18641

9 1/2

 

 

22009

17553

9 7/8

 

 

21064

16851

10 3/8

 

 

20221

16203

10 3/4

 

 

19443

15603

11 1/8

 

 

18723

15045

11 5/8

 

 

18054

14544

12   

 

 

17453

13962

12 1/2

 

 

16755

 

13   

 

 

16110

 

13 1/2

 

 

15513

 

14   

 

 

14959

 

14 1/2

 

 

14444

 

15   

 

 

13866

 

*American Society of Agronomy

 

 

 

 

Residual Nitrate-Nitrogen Levels

 

We are always looking for ways to cut crop production costs., Some producers are looking again a nitrogen application levels to cut down on input costs as we enter into the growing season regarding some of their fertilizer practices they have used in the past. 

 

—I will refer again to the following table. Reducing your nitrogen rates may improve your initial bottom line, however, it can also prove to be more detrimental to crop development since nitrogen is the largest element required for active growth.  The following table represents what both corn and soybeans require to gain average yield goals in a normal corn/soybean rotation.  (Remember you get fertility credits from the previous year’s crop.)

Soybean Use and Removal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bushels/Acre

 

90

85

80

75

70

65

60

55

50

45

40

 

Used for

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nitrogen (N)

Grain

342

323

304

285

266

247

228

209

190

171

152

 

Stover

99

93.5

88

82.5

77

71.5

66

60.5

55

49.5

44

 

Total Use

441

416.5

392

367.5

343

318.5

294

269.5

245

220.5

196

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corn Use and Removal

Bushels/Acre

 

300

280

260

240

220

200

180

160

140

120

100

 

Used for

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nitrogen (N)

Grain

270

252

234

216

198

180

162

144

126

108

90

 

Stover

135

126

117

108

99

90

81

72

63

54

45

 

Total Use

405

378

351

324

297

270

243

216

189

162

135

 

 

 

WANT TO TRY THE LINEUPS??  If you have been intrigued by the Asgrow or DeKalb brands but never tried any on your own acres for whatever the reason, planting a plot with us is a way to evaluate the lineup under your management style…..We realize that everyone in the seed business has a number or variety that can work—will it work for you?  What is your return on your investment?  We are in constant pursuit of answers to these simple questions and renew the process each year with the new genetic classes. 

 

The process is quite simple----you pick the area where to plant the plot.  We are not concerned regarding fertility, straightness of rows, planting date, etc.  We invite the opportunity to work with you and on your land.  We want your evaluation in combination with all of the plot locations to determine a level of confidence of performance within this region.  We supply the seed and the manpower to get it planted in a timely fashion.  We will also be there throughout the season to soil sample, evaluate the good and the bad, and identify genetic capabilities in each growing environment.  At harvest, most of the data these days is gathered via yield monitor in combination with satellite imagery, which saves time and also provides a clearer view of the genetics x the environment involved.  At the end of the year, your data, in combination with about 36 others in SE Nebraska, develops a “grid result” of the genetic performance.  Think of this:  If the same hybrid or variety yielded the best in all 36 locations, under 36 different management styles, fertility, planting date, etc., what kind of confidence can we develop with that genetic package going forward?  The following are our entries for our 2018 Corn and Soybean Plots:

 

2018 Soybean Market Development Plot Set

1. AG30X9 – Class of ’19

4.6 bu advantage in limited testing vs AG2733 (limited comparisons)

Description and positioning:

  • Cyst bean with outstanding west to east performance fit and strong emergence
  • Medium-tall gray plant with good standability
  • Resistant to SCN and good PRR package and strong field tolerance

 

2. AG31X9 – Class of ’19

5.0 bu advantage in limited testing vs AG33X8 (limited comparisons)

Description and positioning:

  • Cyst bean with broad fit and good canopy cover
  • Medium-tall gray plant with good standability
  • Resistant to SCN and good PRR and excellent field tolerance

 

3. AG32X8 – Class of ’18

Win Percentage for AG32X8: 71% against leading competitive varieties +/- .4 RM (73 comparisons)

Avg. Yield Advantage for AG32X8: 1.9 bu against leading competitive varieties +/- .4 RM (73 comparisons)

Description and positioning:

  • High yield potential in a cyst bean
  • Strong PRR & BSR defense
  • Medium tall plant with excellent standability

 

4. AG33X8 – Class of ’18

Win Percentage for AG33X8: 71% against leading competitive varieties +/- .4 RM (95 comparisons)

Avg. Yield Advantage for AG33X8: 2.5 bu against leading competitive varieties +/- .4 RM (95 comparisons)

  • High yielding cyst bean adaptable to all row spacings and tillage systems
  • Excellent SDS, PRR, & BSR defense
  • Medium tall plant with good standability, emergence, and No Till adaptability

 

5. AG34X7 – Class of ’17

Win Percentage for AG34X7: 71% against leading competitive varieties +/- .4 RM (191 comparisons)

Avg. Yield Advantage for AG34X7: 2.6 bu against leading competitive varieties +/- .4 RM (191 comparisons)

Description and positioning:

  • Widely adapted like AG3432 with exceptional yield potential
  • Medium tall gray plant with excellent emergence and average standability
  • SCN resistance and good tolerance to BSR
  • Outstanding Phytophthora package with Rps1K and solid field resistance

 

6. AG34X9 – Class of ’19

3.0 bu advantage in limited testing vs AG33X8 (limited comparisons)

Description and positioning:

  • Widely adapted west to east with exceptional high end yield potential
  • Medium tall gray plant with strong emergence and standability
  • SCN resistance and good tolerance to BSR
  • Outstanding Phytophthora package with Rps1C and solid field resistance

 

7. AG35X9 – Class of ’19

5.8 bu advantage in limited testing vs AG34X7 (limited comparisons)

Description and positioning:

  • High yield potential bean best suited for tougher, stress prone soils
  • Medium tall aggressive plant with excellent emergence and average standability
  • SCN resistance and good tolerance to BSR
  • Outstanding Phytophthora package with Rps1C and solid field resistance

 

8. P35T75 – Pioneer T series bean – touted as one of their best new Xtend varieties

 

9. AG36X6 – Class of ’16

Win Percentage for AG36X6: 84% against leading competitive varieties +/- .4 RM (298 comparisons)

Avg. Yield Advantage for AG36X6: 4.7 bu against leading competitive varieties +/- .4 RM (298 comparisons)

  • High yielding cyst bean with good canopy closure for wider row spacings
  • Strong Southern Stem Canker, SDS, PRR, & BSR defense
  • Medium height plant with excellent standability, emergence, and No Till adaptability

 

10. AG37X8 – Class of ’18

Win Percentage for AG37X8: 70% against leading competitive varieties +/- .4 RM (77 comparisons)

Avg. Yield Advantage for AG37X8: 2.6 bu against leading competitive varieties +/- .4 RM (77 comparisons)

  • High yielding cyst bean adaptable to all row spacings and tillage systems
  • Good SDS & PRR defense
  • Medium tall plant with excellent standability, emergence, and No Till adaptability

 

11. P37T72 – Pioneer T series bean – touted as one of their best new Xtend varieties

 

12. AG37X9 – Class of ’19

3.4 bu advantage in limited testing vs AG37X8 (limited comparisons)

Description and positioning:

  • Broadly adapted 3.7 RM product with excellent emergence and average standability
  • Excellent tolerance to PRR and Southern Stem Canker
  • Tall gray plant with SCN resistance, Rps1A for PRR

 

13. AG39X7 – Class of ’17

Win Percentage for AG39X7: 64% against leading competitive varieties +/- .4 RM (139 comparisons)

Avg. Yield Advantage for AG39X7: 2.2 bu against leading competitive varieties +/- .4 RM (139 comparisons)

Description and positioning:

  • RR2Xtend/SR stacked bean with strong performance in all tested geographies
  • Medium tall tawny plant with excellent emergence and standability
  • SCN resistance and good tolerance to SDS & BSR
  • Outstanding Phytophthora package with Rps1C and solid field resistance

 

14. AG41X8 – Class of ’18

Win Percentage for AG41X8: 56% against leading competitive varieties +/- .4 RM (41 comparisons)

Avg. Yield Advantage for AG41X8: 0.8 bu against leading competitive varieties +/- .4 RM (41 comparisons)

Description and positioning:

  • Broadly adapted 4.1 RM product with excellent emergence and standability
  • Tall gray plant with SCN resistance, Rps1c for PRR
  • SR tolerance and similar SDS tolerance to AG4135

 

 

 

2018 Corn Market Development Plot Set

1. DKC58-35RIB – GENDGVT2Pro and also available as a GENSS (DKC58-34RIB)

12.2 bu advantage in limited testing vs DKC58-08

Description and positioning:

  • Disease Shield High end yield potential maintained even under heat and drought stress
  • Exceptional stalk and root strength very good greensnap tolerance
  • Strong foliar disease package and good Goss’ Wilt tolerance

 

2. DKC60-88RIB – GENDGVT2Pro and available as a GENSS (DKC60-87RIB)

Win Percentage for DKC60-88RIB: 65% against leading competitive hybrids +/- 4 RM (238 comparisons)

Avg. Yield Advantage for DKC60-88RIB: 7.3 bu against leading competitive hybrids +/- 4 RM (238 comparisons)

Description and positioning:

  • Excellent top end yield and plant health across all environments with good ear flex
  • Excellent stalk and root strength, high greensnap tolerance, and Food Grade grain quality
  • Good overall disease package and very good Goss’ Wilt tolerance

 

3. DKC61-98RIB – GENVT2Pro

Comparable yield in limited testing vs DKC64-35 but a full point dryer on grain moisture

Description and positioning:

  • Disease Shield Excellent top end yield and plant health across all environments with semi-fixed ear
  • Great stalk and root strength, with excellent greensnap tolerance and Food Grade grain quality
  • Great overall disease package and good Goss’ Wilt tolerance

 

4. P1197AMT –Pioneer sales focus – touted as one of their best 

Win Percentage for P1197 all trait options: 69% against leading competitive and Pioneer hybrids +/- 4 RM (1478 comparisons)

Avg. Yield Advantage for P1197 all trait options: 7.3 bu against leading competitive and Pioneer hybrids +/- 4 RM (1478 comparisons)

 

5. DKC63-57RIB – GENVT2Pro

Comparable yield in limited testing vs DKC64-35 but a half point dryer on grain moisture

Description and positioning:

  • Excellent top end yield west to east with great ear flex
  • Good stalk and root strength, with great greensnap tolerance and Food Grade grain quality
  • Good overall disease package and very good Goss’ Wilt tolerance

 

6. DKC64-35RIB – GENVT2Pro and also available as a GENSS (DKC64-34RIB)

Win Percentage for DKC64-35RIB: 82% against leading competitive hybrids +/- 4 RM (296 comparisons)                  

Avg. Yield Advantage for DKC64-35RIB: 19.7 against leading competitive hybrids +/- 4 RM (296 comparisons)

Description and positioning:

  • Disease Shield Top end yield performance with low end stability in drought and heat and Food Grade grain quality
  • Excellent stalk and root strength with very good greensnap tolerance
  • Strong agronomics, very good Goss’ Wilt tolerance, and superior Staygreen

 

7. DKC65-95RIB – GENVT2Pro and also available as a GENSS (DKC65-94RIB)

Win Percentage for DKC65-94RIB: 68% against leading competitive hybrids +/- 4 RM (79 comparisons)                    

Avg. Yield Advantage for DKC65-94RIB: 8.1 against leading competitive hybrids +/- 4 RM (79 comparisons)

Description and positioning:

  • Excellent top end yield and plant health across all environments with good ear flex
  • Good stalk and root strength, high greensnap tolerance, and excellent drought tolerance
  • Good overall disease package and great test weight.

2018 Corn Market Development Plot Set continued

8.  DKC66-75RIB – GENVT2Pro and also available as a GENSS (DKC66-74RIB)

Win Percentage for DKC66-74RIB: 88% against leading competitive hybrids +/- 4 RM (69 comparisons)                    

Avg. Yield Advantage for DKC66-74RIB: 18.8 against leading competitive hybrids +/- 4 RM (69 comparisons)

Description and positioning:

  • Disease Shield Excellent top end yield and plant health across all environments with moderate ear flex
  • Good stalk and root strength, high greensnap tolerance, and robust plant canopy
  • Good overall disease package and very good Goss’ Wilt tolerance

 

9. P1751AMT – Pioneer sales focus – touted as one of their best

Win Percentage for P1751 all trait options: 41% against leading competitive and Pioneer hybrids +/- 4 RM (480 comparisons)

Avg. Yield Advantage for P1751 all trait options: -2.0 bu against leading competitive and Pioneer hybrids +/- 4 RM (480 comparisons)

 

10. DKC70-27RIB – GENVT2Pro

Win Percentage for DKC70-27RIB: 91% against leading competitive hybrids +/- 4 RM (44 comparisons)                    

Avg. Yield Advantage for DKC70-27RIB: 20.9 against leading competitive hybrids +/- 4 RM (44 comparisons)

Description and positioning:

  • Disease Shield Excellent top end yield and plant health across all environments with good ear flex
  • Good stalk and root strength, high greensnap tolerance, and robust plant canopy
  • Good overall disease package and good Goss’ Wilt tolerance

 

 

John W. McNamara

Agronomist

Wiles Bros. Inc.

606 Wiles Road

Plattsmouth NE. 68048

(402) 298-8550--Office

(402) 499-3870--Cell

(402) 298-7174--Fax

 
Copyright DTN. All rights reserved. Disclaimer.
Powered By DTN